Lighting the Way since 1953  
   
 
SIFE to regionals for Spring Break

By: Stephanie Wright/Assistant Editore

     This Spring Break, dedicated members of Wayland’s Students in Free Enterprise team will be headed to their regional competition Monday, March 17, in Dallas.
      SIFE is a nonprofit organization that allows students to learn about the free enterprise system through hands-on experience.
      SIFE teams on 800 college campuses across the nation use what they learn in class and implement that knowledge to better their communities.
      SIFE institutes community out-reach programs teaching them the six pillars of economics.
      Some of the projects SIFE has been involved with is the computer literacy program at the Community Classroom, teaching financial literacy, profit loss, etc., at elementary fairs, and teaching business management to a local Girl Scout Troop.
      SIFE also hosts ethics matches to make college students more aware of the ethic problems that go on in business settings. They also assist small businesses in advertising, keeping books, etc., to help encourage entrepreneurship.
      At regionals, the team will present these projects to the judges. There are various leagues in the competition and schools of all sizes are represented. Each league is only able to send two teams to nationals. Even so, the team isn’t worried.
     “Wayland has made a name for itself in the past,” Ashley Beggs, a senior from Muleshoe who is participating at regionals said. “Wayland has a good tradition at regionals.”
      What is different in SIFE competitions is the fact that teams can compete in any region they want regardless of where they are from.
      While Wayland’s team is going to Dallas which is closer and cheaper, some teams use regionals as a strategic device. If they know of a team they might not win against, they will go to another regional.
      Wayland’s SIFE is prepared for regionals and has worked hard to get there.
“We’re the only SIFE team that is not university sponsored and we don’t get credit for it or money, so we have to raise our own funds,” Beggs said.