Book Reviews

The Religious Right: A Reference Handbook

Glenn H. Utter

In this third edition-the last was published by ABC-CLIO in 2001-Lamar University professors Utter (political science) and Storey (history) offer orientation to the often amorphous movement known as the religious Right. This group encompasses a wide variety of religious persuasions, ranging from evangelical Protestants to conservative Jews.

more » Disparate assemblages find unity through common political goals, such as legislating against abortion and homosexual rights. Utter and Storey follow the basic outline of offering information through chronology, biographical profiles, survey data (with analysis), primary documents, an extensive directory of organizations, suggested readings from various perspectives and on multiple topics, and a voluminous bibliography of multimedia resources. Considerable qualitative additions have been made to each category. BOTTOM LINE There are a few detractions within the work's overall scope. First, a theologian's perspective would have helped to investigate the beliefs of the religious Right more circumspectly. Second, occasional value judgments belie the authors' perception of the movement, and, finally, information is sporadically given by mentioning that a source "has been quoted as saying" without proper citation. Overall, however, Utter and Storey masterfully articulate the motivations of this complex political entity with copious references for further study. Recommended for libraries with special religious and political collections.

Call Number: REF BR526 .U88 2007

Reviewed by:
Dann Wigner, Coordinator of Distance Services - wignerd@wbu.edu
Copyright Library Journal

Journal Keeping: Writing for Spiritual Growth

by Luann Budd

Journaling isn't just for those wanting to record a private diary of events. Luann Budd explains how you can use a private journal as a tool to further your spiritual growth in ways you might have only imagined.

more » Journal Keeping: Writing for Spiritual Growth is split into three sections. The first section is geared toward the beginning journalist who may be picking up the pen and blank book for the first time. Each section (and chapter) becomes progressively more advanced, urging the journalist to do more than just write a few sentences each entry. Budd explains how one can integrate Bible reading, devotional time, life experiences, and so on into her journal writing. Only by honest writing from the heart can journaling bring insight that reveals truth to the journalist, whether it's a sign from God, a spiritual truth, or even a persistent sin that needs rooting out.

Budd's clear, down-to-earth writing is easy to read and makes her points readily known. While the major emphasis is on private journaling for spiritual growth, it provides insight for anybody who journals, whether it's a personal diary, spiritual journal, or even a blog on the Internet. If you're into journaling or have thought about it, give this book a shot. Weighing in at just under 200 pages, this book can be finished in a few days even on a busy schedule.

Call Number: BV 4509.5 .B83 2002

Reviewed by:
Chris Williams, Access Services - williamsc@wbu.edu